Eretz Yisrael Time

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Thursday, March 09, 2006
A few months ago there was a comment "war" on this site mostly between PurpleParrot and truth (and everyone else) about Jews (religious vs. secular) volunteering. Here is an article that discusses just that.


Eighteen Percent of Israeli Jews Volunteer

19:30 Mar 09, '06 / 9 Adar 5766
By Ezra HaLevi

According to a survey released by the Ministry of Industry, Trade and Labor, 650,000 Israelis take part in some regular volunteer work – 15.7% of Israel’s Jewish and Arab adults.

According to the survey, 18% of Israel’s Jews engage in volunteer work, while half that proportional percentage - just 9.1% - of the country’s Arabs do.Of Israel's volunteers, about half work with organizations such as Magen David Adom emergency medical services and the Yad Sarah medical equipment lending organization. The other half volunteer on a private basis or for smaller groups.

Volunteers contributed an average of eleven hours a month.

Among Jewish volunteers, the study demonstrated, volunteerism increased with level of religious observance and was highest among the Hareidi-Religious sector.

4 comments:

GregoryT said...

I wonder what H, the commenter on Israel Perspectives would say to that.

Joe Settler said...

Who cares?

tafka PP said...

Yes, except that religious people have the added incentive/requirement of performing mitzvot in doing charitable acts of chesed, etc. So those who are not obligated (or taught) to do so- ie, secular folks- but yet do so anyway, should get extra points in my book.

Also, as I recall, I never claimed that the frum world doesn't volunteer. I took issue with the intimation that ONLY the frum world volunteers and the secular are a bunch of sponging wasters.

k?

Joe Settler said...

Religious or not, all Jews have a mitzva of doing chessed, and all Jews (and people in general) get rewarded for doing good deeds.

But as you probably know, in Judaism the mitzva is considered greater (more points) for someone who does a mitzva he is commanded to do, as opposed to one who does the same mitzva that he wasn't obligated to fulfill.

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